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Poster: cush11 Date: May 10, 2007 10:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

An excellent idea GOPig... The job is yours! From what I gather you were pretty much in the thick of it. While we seem to be about the same age, and got into the music around the same time, I was a kid in the LA suburbs... I heard a lot, but now with all the archives available I see that I missed way more than I heard...

Hand me my ole guitar, pass the prozac round...

;)

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: May 11, 2007 5:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

Writing a dissertation twenty years ago did me in for anything longer than this post.

However, I have just enough personal experience to know what is out there and to know that I want more.

When I was 12, I saw Dylan at Town Hall--and had been listening to his first releases for a while. But before that, my cousin, Krazy Karen (9 years my senior), used to sneak me down to the Village to places like Gerde's Folk City. It was all way over my head--that this was a "Scene"--a beginning, a middle, whatever. But this was enough of an exposure to make me realize later that the explosion in 1967 did not occur in a vacuum.

Really, the cultural cross pollinization is amazing, especially in Amerika. We have our own original idioms (blues and jazz) that owe much to both the European instruments (guitar and brass) and the African rhythms plus the suffering rendered through enslavement. The celebration that comes from the African--Amerikan musical heritage joins with the white Amerikan folk tradition to create r and b. All this in about 100 years. Take that Mozart! Amerikan roots music emulates the Amerikan experience--it is a hybrid born of a constantly changing cultural identity--an identity often in conflict with itself (Amerika, after all, is the spawn of the stone cold grounded self sufficiency of Puritanism coupled with the far reaching limitless imagination of our Explorer heritage--Cotton Mather meets De Soto). That cultural conflict is an incredibly creative force.

Just look at Captain Trips: how many cultural ingredients in that DNA? And growing up in San Fran around a bar and a rooming house? Studying bluegrass and then going electric with it? And Phil? Bringing in that grand classical tradition steeped in experimentation? Pig's blues?

Perhaps the single best example of the eclecticism that fueled all this innovation was the Fillmore West--Bill Graham knew what he was doing.

How many of you have entered one musical door from another music's room? Discovered Bill Monroe through Jerry or Miles through Phil?

Nope. No books here.

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Poster: patkelley Date: May 11, 2007 7:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

Why Amerika, rather than America? I've seen that before, but dont get it.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 11, 2007 8:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

Or Amerikkka. But I've usually seen Amerika in reference to Kafka's novel of that title, Amerika.

http://www.webster.edu/~corbetre/personal/reading/kafka-amerika.html

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: May 11, 2007 10:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

Amerika? Just a holdover spelling from the sixties. From the German spelling, I suppose, but used as a rhetorical "anti-establishment" symbol.


Either that or I can't spell.

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: May 11, 2007 6:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: My kind of read . . . .

Hey Pig,

I agree we could use a more thorough examination of this musical period in history, but if you haven't read it yet (and i'm guessing you have), Tom Wolfe's "Electric Kool Aid Acid Test" is a must for capturing the vibe of the hippie crash-and-burn era, especially in and around SF.

Not a rock book per se, but Jerry and the boys as well as Kesey and the rest are prominently featured.

Great book that launched Wolfe's career (i'd also recommend Bonfire, A Man in Full, and his more recent book of essays and articles called "Hooking Up")